The PROTECT Study

News Feed

Syndicated news from King's College London School of Biomedical Sciences

Using an experimental drug called Compound 43, King's College London researchers have identified a promising approach for tackling the hallmark Alzheimer's disease protein, tau.

King's College London researchers have developed a method that could predict which Parkinson's patients will experience cognitive decline, before they show any symptoms of memory problems.

A new study from researchers at King's College London and UCL has confirmed that people with Down syndrome who develop dementia can benefit from commonly used Alzheimer's drugs, despite having often being excluded from drug trials.

Researchers from King's College London have made a significant advance in our understanding of a particular type of brain cell, which may one day have implications for the treatment of neurological disorders.

For the first time, new research shows people with schizophrenia can train themselves to control brain regions linked to verbal hallucinations, using an MRI scanner and a computerised rocket game.

A new multi-centre study, led by researchers from King's College London and UCL, has found that people with Down Syndrome develop earlier onset of Alzheimer's Disease, with an average age of diagnosis between 55 and 56 - 20 to 30 years earlier than other individuals who are at risk of being diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

New IoPPN research, published in Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, suggests a link between early childhood trauma and changes in brain anatomy consistent with the development of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID).

Professor Carmine Pariante from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), has been awarded a Distinguished Investigator Grant by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation.

New King's College London research, published today in eLife, shows that adults born prematurely - who also suffered small brain injuries around the time of birth - have lower levels of dopamine in the brain.

Researchers at King's College London have discovered new mechanisms of cell death, which may be involved in debilitating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

A recent multi-centre study, led by King's College London and the University of Manchester, has established that synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease is driven by a specific signalling pathway.

New King's College London research reveals how blood inflammation affects the birth and death of brain cells, which could offer new treatment targets for antidepressants.

A major new study will investigate global risk factors for depression by analysing data about family and social environment, stressful experiences, brain images, and biological data, in 10-24 year olds from the UK, Brazil, Nigeria and Nepal.

More needs to be done to challenge stigma and increase awareness of dementia in Africa. Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) has published its first report on the impact of dementia in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), at its 4th Sub-Saharan African Regional Conference.

New King's College London research suggests that babies born very prematurely show accelerated brain development in adult life, as their brains look 'older' compared to non-premature babies.

Brain stimulation could be used to treat cognitive deficits frequently associated with schizophrenia, according to a new study from King's College London.

A chemotherapy drug used to treat brain cancer may increase vulnerability to depression by stopping new brain cells from growing, according to a new King's College London study out today in Translational Psychiatry.

King's College London is one of five leading universities announced today to receive funding as part of a new UK Dementia Research Institute (UK DRI).

Researchers at King's College London and the Francis Crick Institute have discovered a type of brain cell that prevents mice from being overly immobile.

Researchers from King's College London have discovered a specific class of inhibitory neurons in the cerebral cortex which plays a key role in how the brain encodes spatial information. The findings are published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Research from King's College London reveals a new method of repurposing existing drugs as novel treatments for depression, using laboratory studies of brain cells.

Key symptoms of bulimia nervosa, including the urge to binge eat and restrict food intake, are reduced by delivering electricity to parts of the brain using non-invasive brain stimulation, according to new research by King's College London.

A new study from King's College London and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust has shown for the first time that cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) strengthens specific connections in the brains of people with psychosis, and that these stronger connections are associated with long-term reduction in symptoms and recovery eight years later.

King's College London is part of a major new research project exploring the role of immune cells in Alzheimer's Disease.

A liver hormone called 'FGF21' may regulate alcohol drinking by acting directly on a receptor in the brain, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London, Imperial College London and UT Southwestern Medical Center.

The MRC has awarded £3 million to King's College London for a world-class centre that will aim to transform our understanding of disease mechanisms underlying brain disorders, and translate this knowledge into clinical advances that change people's lives.

Professor Marco Catani and Stefano Sandrone from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have been awarded the 2016 Award for Outstanding Book in the History of the Neurosciences.

A new report from Alzheimer's Disease International, authored by researchers at King's College London and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), reveals that most people with dementia have yet to receive a diagnosis, let alone comprehensive and continuing healthcare.

New research by King's College London, Imperial College London and Imanova Center for Imaging Sciences, suggests that inflammation of the hippocampus could lead to increased rates of depressive symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis.

A research team at King's College London has used a new approach to study a hallmark dementia protein called tau in mice, revealing that a drug called phenylbutyrate can protect against damage caused by the protein.

A major new research programme supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) launches today [26 April], which will develop new ways of monitoring major depressive disorder, epilepsy, and multiple sclerosis using wearable devices and smartphone technology.

Core symptoms of anorexia nervosa, including the urge to restrict food intake and feeling fat, are reduced after just one session of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, according to King's College London research published today in PLOS ONE.

Professor Sir Michael Rutter has received a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Autism Professionals Awards, in recognition of his outstanding contribution to research in autism.

Researchers from King's College London have identified a coordinated network of brain activity which may explain how the brain anticipates and processes rewards.

Researchers have found that microscopic alterations in brain wiring - within regions of the brain which underlie reasoning and awareness - could be responsible for the association between childhood IQ, low birthweight and later psychotic experiences.

Research at King's College London has revealed subtle brain differences in adult males with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which may go some way towards explaining why symptoms persist into adulthood in some people with the disorder.

Scientists from King's College London and the University of Roehampton have identified a key mechanism in the brain which might be associated with the onset and development of psychosis.

An international research collaboration has shed new light on how DNA sequence variation can influence gene activity in the developing human brain.

Smoking high potency 'skunk-like' cannabis can damage a crucial part of the brain responsible for communication between the two brain hemispheres, according to a new study by scientists from King's College London and Sapienza University of Rome.

Young people are able to regulate activity within their 'emotional brain' when prompted to 'think happy thoughts', using real-time MRI feedback of brain activity, according to a new study by researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London and Oxford University.

A new King's College London study has identified both unique and shared brain patterns in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and bipolar disorder (BD), which could, in the future, help clinicians more accurately diagnose and treat the conditions. The research is published today in Psychological Medicine.

Playing online games that challenge reasoning and memory skills – brain training - could have significant benefits for older people in their day to day lives, according to a new study published today (3 Nov) in JAMDA.

A study, published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry, is the first to find that immune cells are more active in the brains of people at risk of schizophrenia* as well as those already diagnosed with the disease.

King's College London Alzheimer's Research UK (ARUK) Network Centre held its first Dementia Symposium bringing together King's dementia researchers to share their research and ideas

Researchers from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (MRC CDN) at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London, have discovered a new molecular 'switch' that controls the properties of neurons in response to changes in the activity of their neural network.

A new report led by King's College London reveals one person develops dementia every three seconds across the globe.

Adversity during the first six years of life was associated with higher levels of childhood internalising symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, in a group of boys, as well as altered brain structure in late adolescence between the ages of 18 and 21.

Researchers at King's College London have identified significant differences in brain activity between children whose attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continues into adolescence and adulthood, and those who later grow out of the disorder.

Scientists have identified a single blood protein that may indicate the development of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) years before symptoms appear, a disorder that has been associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease or other dementias.

New scanning methods which map the wiring of the brain could provide a valuable new tool to predict people at risk of schizophrenia.

A research collaboration involving scientists from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London has received over £3.2m in funding from the Biomedical Catalyst (BMC) for the first in-human trial of a drug that targets a cause of schizophrenia in the brain.

King's is most saddened to hear of the death of Sir Terry Pratchett, one of the world's most successful authors and latterly, vigorous campaigner and generous provider of funds for the study of dementia, having been diagnosed with early-onset of Alzheimer's disease in 2007.

A process previously thought to be mere background noise in the brain has been found to shape the growth of neurons as the brain develops, according to research from the MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology (CDN), IoPPN, published in Cell Reports.

Female and male brains develop differently in the womb because of changes to how their DNA is read, according to researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) and the University of Exeter, published in Genome Research.

The neurotransmitter acetylcholine plays a key role in cognitive flexibility, a finding that has implications for treatments to restore brain function, according to research from the IoPPN, recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Adults with psychopathic personality disorder process information related to punishment and reward differently due to functional differences in their brains, according to a new study from researchers at the IoPPN, published in Lancet Psychiatry.

The effect of genes that influence how regions of the subcortical part of the brain develop have been studied with respect to behaviour and neuropsychiatric diseases by researchers at the IoPPN recently published in Nature.

Several molecules that are found in the blood and derived from cholesterol have improved our understanding of how Alzheimer's disease develops, according to research carried out at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN).

Scientists from King's are part of a new consortium looking at whether existing anti-inflammatory drugs could be repurposed to provide fresh treatments for Alzheimer's disease and depression. It will be the largest study ever investigating inflammation in the brain.

Researchers from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience at King's College London have proposed that repetitive negative thinking may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Scientists at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London have demonstrated for the first time that target-independent communication between axons is essential for the correct wiring in the developing brain.

Researchers from the Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science Department at King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) have identified a key region of the brain that gives us the sense that we control our own thoughts and movements.

King's College London is part of the ENIGMA Project - a major global initiative, funded by the US National Institutes of Health, that will bring together brain scans and DNA from 30,000 people at over 185 sites globally to identify risk factors behind mental illness.

The NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre Nucleus, the BRC's data management and informatics facility, celebrated 5 years of pioneering innovation and achievement in mental health and dementia translational research on Monday 29th September.

Veena Kumari, Professor of Experimental Psychology at King's College London has been awarded the prestigious Humboldt Award in recognition of a lifetime of achievements in research.

New research from King's College London, published in PLOS Medicine, suggests that cholesterol does not directly increase the risk for late-onset Alzheimer's disease.

Dementia risk for populations can be modified through tobacco control and better prevention, detection and control of hypertension and diabetes, according to the 2014 World Alzheimer Report by King's College London researchers with Alzheimer's Disease International.

Dementia UK: The Second Edition, prepared by King's College London and the London School of Economics for the Alzheimer's Society, finds that the cost of dementia to the UK has hit £26 billion a year and that people with dementia, their carers and families shoulder two-thirds of the cost themselves.

From Monday September 1st 2014 the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) will be known as the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN). Our new name reflects the breadth of our research and education expertise and the changing way we understand mental health disorders and brain disease.

A team of researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London and the University of Exeter has uncovered some of the strongest evidence yet that epigenetic changes in the brain play a role in Alzheimer's disease.

Scientists at King's College London have identified a set of 10 proteins in the blood which can predict the onset of Alzheimer's, marking a significant step towards developing a blood test for the disease.

An international collaboration of scientists, including King's College London, have learned that it is possible to predict teenage binge-drinking, and found that aspects of life experience, personality and brain structure are strong determinants of future alcohol misuse.

Researchers at King's College London have discovered how a molecular 'scaffold' which allows key parts of cells to interact, comes apart in dementia and motor neuron disease, revealing a potential new target for drug discovery.

By studying the brains of teenagers who are carriers of an Alzheimer's disease risk gene, researchers at King's College London are attempting to identify the earliest processes involved in the predisposition to Alzheimer's disease.

A team of six PhD students from the Institute of Psychiatry have won the King's Lion's Den Challenge, with 'Cognitracker', a health app which monitors users' cognitive health to improve early detection of diseases such as Alzheimer's.

A new by researchers at King's College London report highlights that undernutrition is a major problem among people with dementia with 20-45% of those with dementia in the community experiencing clinically significant weight loss over one year.

For the first time, scientists at King's College London have identified a gene linking the thickness of the grey matter in the brain to intelligence. The study may help scientists understand biological mechanisms behind some forms of intellectual impairment.

William Yule, Emeritus Professor of Applied Child Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London has been named one of the UK's top 100 scientists by the Science Council, in recognition for his work on childhood PTSD.

The NIHR Biomedical Research Unit for Dementia at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust (SLAM) and King's College London is part of a new UK-wide multi-million pound programme to accelerate progress in dementias research.

Professor Simon Lovestone, Institute of Psychiatry at King's, sets out what he hopes the Summit will achieve, the challenges of developing new therapies for dementia, and the possibilities of one day preventing the disease.

A new report, by researchers at King's College London and Alzheimer's Disease International, reveals that the number of people living with dementia worldwide in 2013 is now estimated at 44 million, reaching 76 million in 2030 and 135 million by 2050.

Brains of women with bulimia respond differently to women without bulimia when shown images of slim women. Both groups responded similarly to pictures of food, according to a study led by researchers at King's.

Researchers from King's College London and Brown University have identified how the 'wiring' in toddlers' brains develops to successfully learn language. The study is published in The Journal of Neuroscience.

The report, produced by a team of researchers led by Prof Martin Prince at King's College London, reveals the global Alzheimer's epidemic is creating a shortage of caregivers and highlights the lack of support for family members.

Researchers from King's College London and the University of Nottingham have identified neuroimaging markers in the brain which could help predict whether people with psychosis respond to antipsychotic medications or not.

On BBC 3 tonight, Jess McClelland at the Institute of Psychiatry at King's explains how brain stimulation is being investigated as a potential new treatment for anorexia. Following a successful pilot study, are now recruiting participants for larger trial.

Professor Michael Kopelman from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry has received a Distinguished Career Award from the International Neuropsychological Society (INS) in recognition of his major and sustained contributions to neuropsychology.

Comedian Jo Brand has been elected an Honorary Fellow of King's College London, in recognition of her work as an advocate for people with mental health problems, support of mental health research and long-standing association with the IoP and SLaM.

For the first time, scientists at King's College London have identified how a pathway in the brain which is unique to humans allows us to learn new words.

Researchers at King's College London have been awarded £2.52 million by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) to build a computational model of the brain networks involved in epilepsy.

Dr Andrea Danese, MRC Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre and Department of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry has been recognized by the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation (formerly NARSAD) for exceptional clinical research.

New technologies that can help people with serious disorders affecting the brain are needed, but must be used in ways that put the care and safety of patients first, says a report by the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, co-authored by experts from King's.

Research from King's Institute of Psychiatry reveals the mechanism behind how stress hormones reduce the number of new brain cells, offering a potential new avenue for drug discovery.

Staff and students from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's took part in a wide range of events for the Wellcome Trust Wonder Season at the Barbican, inspiring children and adults alike about the world of neuroscience.

A new study by King's Institute of Psychiatry reveals the deep similarities in how the brain regulates behaviour in arthropods and vertebrates. The findings shed new light on the evolution of the brain and behaviour.

Researchers from King's Institute of Psychiatry have discovered that tau, a key constituent of the tangles present in the brain in Alzheimer's disease, can be released from healthy neurons in the absence of cell death.

New research helps explain why some teenagers are more prone to drinking alcohol than others. The study, led by King's Institute of Psychiatry provides the most detailed understanding yet of the brain processes involved in teenage alcohol abuse.

Scientists at King's Institute of Psychiatry have discovered the molecular pathway that drives the changes seen in the brains of Alzheimer's patients, revealing new targets for drug discovery that could be exploited to combat the disease.

New research from King's proves that 'text mining', or using the power of computers to read the entire biomedical knowledge base, is a promising new tool in the search for Alzheimer's disease biomarkers.

The King's Clinical Trials Unit has been awarded full Clinical Trials Unit registration by the UK Clinical Research Collaboration, in recognition of its expertise in centrally coordinating multicentre clinical trials, trial design, data management, and analysis.

Research led by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London has identified genetic variants linked to signaling pathways in the brain likely to be involved in causing bipolar disorder.

Scientists have discovered a number brain networks connected to teenage drug use and ADHD. The findings are based on data collected by IMAGEN, a large European research project led by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's.

New research led by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's finds that conventional estimates of dementia incidence in middle-income countries have been too optimistic - levels might be much the same as in higher-income countries.

Research from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry provides new insight into the effect of antipsychotic medication and lithium on brain structure. The findings may hold clues to new treatment approaches.

New research from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's provides the strongest evidence to date that psychopathy is linked to specific structural abnormalities in the brain.

The Institute of Psychiatry opened its doors to 150 members of the public to showcase cutting edge dementia research at the Institute's seventh Alzheimer's disease Open Day.

A team of neuroscientists from the Institute of Psychiatry have developed a digital atlas of the human brain for iPad based on cutting edge neuro-imaging research from the IoP's NatBrainLab.

Research has found that the dementia drug donepezil, widely used to treat mild to moderate Alzheimer's Disease, also helps in moderate to severe patients, potentially opening up treatment for twice as many sufferers worldwide.

Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry have found a link between molecular tags on our DNA and the weight of the cerebellum, a region of the human brain, providing clues to the causes of schizophrenia and autism.

Research reveals how the brain appears to adapt to compensate for the effects of long-term ADHD medication, suggesting why ADHD medication is more effective short-term than it is long-term.

Brain imaging studies have allowed scientists to differentiate the effect on the brain of specific chemicals found in cannabis, providing the first experimental evidence of the effect cannabis has on the importance people attach to things they perceive.